collections

Collector: Justus Doolittle (1824-1880)

Rev. Justus Doolittle (1824-1880), American Board missionary in China, is well-known for his publications, including

  • Social Life of the Chinese, with some accounts of their religious, governmental, educational and business customs and opinions, with special but not exclusive reference to Fuhchau [Fuzhou] (1865)
  • Social Life of the Chinese: a daguerrotype of daily life in China (1868)
  • A Vocabulary and Hand-book of the Chinese Language (1872).

He was also a collector of Chinese coins. Note the spade-money issued by Wang Mang on the spines of these books!

borg books

Social Life of the Chinese: Religious, Governmental, Educational, and Business Customs and Opinions – by Justus Doolittle (New York, 1865) – first edition (image source: Borg Antiquarian)

And the “facsimile of a Hong Kong cent” on the frontispiece of this book! There are numerous illustrations of coins in Chapter XXIII on Business Customs:

doolitlle image

Social Life of the Chinese: a daguerrotype of daily life in China – by Justus Doolittle (London, 1868) (Source: archive.org)

In A Vocabulary and Hand-book of the Chinese Language, he includes among his sources Hillier’s Translation of the Chronicles of Cash (preface, p.3):

doolitlle vocab

A Vocabulary and Handbook of the Chinese Language – by Justus Doolittle (London, 1872) (source: archive.org)

Doolittle died on 15 June 1880. His collection of Chinese coins was sold a year later by Messrs Bangs & Co., 739 and 741 Broadway, New York City, in June 1881, and a printed catalogue was prepared: Catalogue of American and foreign coins and medals, the collection of O.A. Jenison, of Lansing, Mich. Also, the collection of Chinese coins formed by Rev. Justus Doolittle, of China. Together with a fine and large collection of Union envelopes, the property of a lady of Boston. And a collection of old coin sale catalogues. to be sold by auction, by Messrs. Bangs & Co. … on Wednesday and Thursday, June 22, 23, 1881. A digital version of the Catalogue is available here:

[pp.44-47] Coins of China. Collected and classified by Rev. Justus Doolittle, an eminent Chinese scholar and numismatist: arranged in cards 5½ x 8 in. The references by numbers in red on the cards are to a translation of a Chinese work on Coins, “Chronicles of Cash: a New Arrangement” (See below, No. 1226a) references in black are to R. Wylie’s [sic] work, “Chinese Coins of the Ta-ts’ing Dynasty” (see below No. 1226b). Like most Chinese Coins, they are nearly all in a sort of bronze, varying in composition at different periods; they are generally carefully selected specimens, and it is said that many of the earlier ones are extremely rare. [nos 1182 – 1226b]

1226a   Brief notice of the Chinese work: “Chronicles of Tsien”: a new arrangement by C.B. Hillier; many hundreds of illustrations of Chinese coins from 2356 B.C. to 1623 A.D.; 8˚, paper. Hong Kong, 1852.

1226b   Chinese Coins of the Ta-Ts’ing, or present dynasty of China, by A. Wylie, with author’s autograph; hundreds of engravings; 8˚, paper. Hong Kong, 1857.

doolittle

Doolittle’s grave in Sunset Hill Cemetery, Clinton, Oneida County, New York, USA (Source: Findagrave.com)

The Diary of Justus B. Doolittle, covering his life as a foreign missionary in Foochow [Fuzhou], China, until 1873 is in the Hamilton College collection (Clinton, NY), and a digital version is available here. A family photo is included at the end of the digital version – but there is something amiss here: the handwritten comments appear to be in three different hands, and the main caption has been questioned (with question marks in pencil).

justus doolittle photo

The caption appears to read “Rev [Justus B. Doolittle] from daguerrotype taken 1860 ??” (Source: Hamilton College Library – Digital Collections)

According to WU Xiaoxin’s Christianity in ChinaA Scholars’ Guide to Resources in the Libraries and Archives of the United States (Routledge, 2017, p.244) the diaries cover the period from c.1750 to 1783.

Lord Charles Beresford’s Chinese coins at the V&A

In 1899, “a small but interesting collection” of Chinese coins was displayed in the Cross Gallery at the Victoria and Albert Museum, in London. Gertrude Burford Rawlings, author of The Story of the British Coinage, Coins and How to Know Them, The Story of Books, and Old London (and a translator of 17th-century French philosophy) wrote a short, descriptive note about the display in Spink’s Numismatic Circular in September 1899. She noted that the collection was lent by Lord Charles Beresford, but offered no further information about him, suggesting perhaps that he was too well known to need an introduction.  (more…)

Supermarket of the Dead 冥間超市

“Supermarket of the Dead. Burnt offerings in China and the Cult of Globalised Consumption”  – an exhibition by Wolfgang Scheppe with the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (Dresden State Art Collections) in the Northwing, Reception Floor of the Residenzschloss (Royal Palace), 14 March to 14 June 2015.  (more…)